Hitler, God, and the Bible by Ray Comfort

Comfort, Ray.  Hitler, God, and the Bible. Washington, D.C.:  WND Books, 2012.  174 pp.  $25.95.  Purchase at Amazon for much less.

Introduction

Ray Comfort is quickly becoming a regular here at Christian Book Notes and I for one am grateful for that.  His ministry, Living Waters, has been a major influence on my life and ministry and I pray that if you have never checked it out, you will do so immediately.  As for this particular resource, Comfort seeks to dispel many myths concerning Adolf Hitler as well as draw a comparison with Hitler’s evil and the current evils we are facing today.

This book is the first in a proposed series of “concise and hopefully insightful exposes on the intersection of icons and faith” (p. vi).

Summary

Divided into two parts with seven chapters, Ray Comfort lays the foundation for what would become Hitler’s political ideology.  Chapter one offers a history of Hitler before entering politics while chapter two touches on how and when Hitler got into politics.  Chapters three and four explain the rise of Nazi-ism and how a nation was carried away by smooth rhetoric and massive propaganda.

The second part looks specifically at the religions elements of Hitler’s Nazi-ism.  Chapter five attempts to explain how Hitler ultimately became the most dangerous anti-Semite ever.  In chapter six, Comfort answers the question “Was Hitler a Christian?” and does so with biblical authority.  The last chapter looks, quite frankly, at the problem of evil.

Review

I honestly learned a lot from reading this work.  I am admittedly not a war buff or anything like that, but I thought I knew a few things about Hitler.  Turns out, I was dead wrong.  I knew very little as the information relayed in Hitler, God, and the Bible quickly showed me.  Often in America we look to Abraham Lincoln who failed numerous times only to later succeed and become President of the United States.  Hitler also failed numerous times only to later become the ruler of Germany.

Furthermore, an extremely frightening parallel was noticed to me (and I do not say this lightly).  While Comfort ultimately did tie the Holocaust in Nazi Germany to the Holocaust in the United States (see, abortion), something else I realized is that much of the political rhetoric that Hitler used can be heard over our airwaves today.  So, too, many of the “open doors” provided by the liberal “Christian” churches to spread the doctrine of Nazi-ism Germany during WWII is strikingly similar to what can be heard today.  I will leave the reader to draw his or her own conclusions.

Ultimately, this work was well-researched and documented.  It proved to be a very enlightening read and revealed much information about someone I thought I knew a little bit about.  Here is a quote that stood out to me as I was reading, “[Hitler] never felt responsible, only entitled–a theme that would have devastating repercussions in the Nazi regime.”  How often has this generation (my generation) been called the “Entitlement generation”?  Let us be careful that we do not see history repeat itself.

Finally, it should be noted that it was this book that was the genesis of the 180 the Movie movement that is turning heads and changing minds today.

Recommendation

While the actual price ($25.95) may be a bit steep, you can get the Kindle version for $7.96.  If you are going to do any study on Hitler at all, then you need to pick up a copy of Hitler, God, and the Bible to understand, from a biblical perspective, what took place.  This book will make a great resource for school curriculum’s when discussing World War II.  Any student of history will enjoy it as well.  Suffice it to say that his goal of being “concise and insightful” was met.  I highly recommend this resource to all.

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