The Lost Sermons of C.H. Spurgeon, Volume 2 Edited by Christian George

The Lost Sermons of C. H. Spurgeon, Volume 2. His Earliest Outlines and Sermons Between 1851 and 1854. Edited by Christian George. Nashville: Broadman and Holman Academic, 2016. 560 pp. $59.99. Purchase at Amazon or for Kindle for less.

Introduction

I reviewed the first volume back in February 2017 and have been eagerly anticipating the second volume ever since. George is a renowned Spurgeon scholar and serves as the curator of The Spurgeon Library as well as assistant professor of historical theology at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, MO. You can read more at Spurgeon.org.

Summary

Again, divided into two parts with an introduction and then sermons 78-134, this time from “Notebook 2.” These sermons are arranged in the order in which they are found in the notebook and contain sermons with titles like “Self-Deception” (Galatians 6:3), “Final Perseverance Certain” (Philippians 1:6), “Wise Men and Fools” (Proverbs 3:35).

Review

As these volumes continue to be published, the modern reader is learning much about how the Prince of Preachers prepared his sermons. In the introduction, George offers keen insight into Spurgeon’s thinking and shows how Spurgeon evolved in his sermon prep.

The breakdown of the sermon selections and books, especially since C.H.S. did not preach verse by verse is fascinating and could very well be telling of what he himself, or his congregation was dealing with at the time of this particular notebook. For example, of the 57 sermons in this notebook, he preached 6 from Isaiah and Luke and 26 of the 66 books of the Bible were used over the course of these 57 messages.

As a pastor, I love seeing how another man thinks and organizes his material. We have long had the finished sermons, but to be able to see how he organized and changed his thoughts is a treasure. Comparing this what he writes in Lectures to My Students, one begins to see the master craftsman in action.

Recommendation

Not everyone is going to want to read these Lost Sermon collections of Charles Spurgeon, but everyone should read at least one volume. Doing so will show many modern Christians and pastors what a solid sermon looks like from start to finish. For those who have gleaned much from Spurgeon over the years, do yourself a favor and get a copy of this volume of his lost sermons as we get to watch (almost first hand) the evolution of a pastor in his craft.