Tag Archives: Richard Rushing

Voices from the Past, Vol. 2 Edited by Richard Rushing

Voices from the Past: Puritan Devotional Readings, Volume 2. Edited by Richard Rushing. Edinburg: The Banner of Truth Trust, 2016. 432 pp. $28.00. Purchase at Westminster Books for less.

Introduction

The first volume was released back in 2010 and was well received by many. Richard Rushing, who served as the editor for both volumes, also edited the Pocket Puritan of Thomas Case’s When Christians Suffer released in 2009.

Summary

As with the first volume, this second volume is a daily devotional of Puritanical writings from over 25 different Puritan writers. There are 366 daily readings that are meant to be read day by day. Also, in one of the three indices there is a topical guide that will take you to a particular area of interest for the reader in the event that they have a specific need on any given day.

Review

While it is always difficult to review a disjointed work such as a daily devotional, it is easy to tell another person why they ought to read a particular devotion. In the case of Voices from the Past Volume 2, I would say that the depth, even in one page of text that the Rushing has selected for each day will hardly be surpassed by any modern day devotional.

Yes, there is a language barrier of sorts as the Puritans wrote in a form of English hardly used today, but these are so short of readings that this should pose no problem for the modern reader. In fact, the reader, in my estimation, will find that they are able to understand far more than they realize in a shorter amount of time than they anticipated.

One more reason I believe you should consider this daily devotional is the manner in which the Puritans handled the Word of God. Again, compared to modern day writing and preaching (most of the books by the Puritans were sermons adapted into books) the Puritans say more in one paragraph than many pastors and writers say in one sermon. Rushing has selected the choicest of sentences and combined them into one daily devotional. Regardless, the Puritans are known for their depth and should be modeled today.

Recommendation

I obviously highly recommend this resource. My hope is that this devotional, like its first volume, would be an introduction to the larger body of Puritanical works. From there, as you are introduced to the great depth of biblical exposition, I believe the foundation for a genuine revival will be laid and a sincerity of faith will begin to take hold within Christendom that has not been seen in over a century.

 

Mortification of Sin by John Owen

Mortification of SinOwen, John. On the Mortification of Sin in Believers. Edinburgh: The Banner of Truth Trust, 2004. 144 pp. $9.00. Purchase at Westminster Books for less or for Kindle.

Introduction

Note: I actually read this from Volume VI of The Works of John Owen published by The Banner of Truth Trust. The book I am picturing, and the one most commonly read, is the “abridged and made easy to read” version.

For many, John Owen is a common name from the Puritan era. Even those who are not in the so-called Reformed camp are familiar with Owen largely in part because of this particular work. He was born in 1616 in Stadhampton, Oxfordshire and died in Ealing, West London, in 1683. During his sixty-seven years he lived out a life full of spiritual experience, literary accomplishment, and national influence so beyond most of his peers that he continues to merit the accolade of ‘the greatest British theologian of all time.’

Summary

In fine literary and Puritanical form, John Owen states succinctly the need to always be killing sin this side of eternity. The primary verse from which this small work is rooted is found in Romans 8:13, “For if ye live after the flesh, ye shall die: but if ye through the Spirit do mortify the deeds of the body, ye shall live.” (I quote the KJV because that is more typical of the language Owen spoke.)

After laying the foundation of the command to kill sin, Owen proposes a number of general principles as to the means by which the Christian ought to be engaged in this daily struggle. These general principles comprise the ensuing three chapters. The first is the necessity of mortification. The second is the means by which one may engage in this battle. The third is the usefulness of mortification.

He then moves into particulars as regards how we are to actually combat sin – a total of nine “directions.” The final chapter. the fourteenth, offers the encouragement that all of this is for the Christian’s assurance of salvation but shows that it is actually the Holy Spirit working in you to mortify sin in your body.

Review

How does one review a work that 1. has been monumental within Christendom concerning the topic of sanctification and 2. has withstood the test of time (it was published in 1656)?

Obviously, Owen writes in an form of English that most today are no longer familiar. Hence, the necessity to make this book easier to read in the Puritan Paperback. Also, it must be noted that the style of writing, as well as their preaching, is lost on many today. They do not follow a simple 3-point outline as we do today. Rather, they would look at one particular point of application and then break it down into a number of subsets and then break those down even further!

What you wind up with is a very thorough dealing with a particular topic that, once you have read the work, you have pretty much read all there is on the topic. Though that is hyperbole, it is safe to say that the treatment with which the Puritans dealt with their topic leaves the no stone unturned. It is from this work where the axiom, “be killing sin or it will be killing you” originated.

It is worth persevering through the language barrier and the length of the treatment of each point and consequent subpoint to read this excellent work.

Recommendation

I have reviewed this classic work in order to introduce it to those who read this website in the even that they have never heard of John Owen or this classic work. I highly recommend it to anyone who is serious about dealing with the sin in their life.

 

Book Spotlight – Voices from the Past

Book Title: Voices from the Past: Puritan Devotional Readings
Author : Richard Rushing
Price: $ 28.00
Purchase at Westminster Books: $19.60
ISBN#: 9781848710481
Binding: Clothbound
Page Count: 428

Description: Over the past fifty years there has been a great resurgence of interest in the writings of the Puritans. The reading of their works has brought great benefit to the people of God in many lands. Christians from many different backgrounds and cultures owe a great debt of gratitude to those faithful pastors and preachers who continue to speak through their writings even though they have long since entered into their heavenly reward. The Puritans really knew how to teach and apply God’s Word in the Spirit’s power!

Richard Rushing has compiled this book of daily devotional readings from his favourite Puritan authors because of the great help he has gained from their Works. ‘How thrilling it has been for me to read the Puritans on the glory and attributes of God, divine providence, fellowship with God, holiness of life and the mortification of indwelling sin, heavenly mindedness, prayer, evangelistic zeal, and trust in the Lord during times of affliction. At every turn these truths are eloquently taught, faithfully applied, and kindly offered as the subject of sweet spiritual meditation.’

This book is sent forth with the prayer that it will open a door to the vast stores of treasure to be found in the writings of the Puritans and that it will stimulate further exploration of this rich spiritual inheritance.